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F1 Primer: The tracks

Mar 12, 2013, 7:52 AM EDT

There are 19 races on the 2013 F1 schedule from Austin to Abu Dhabi. Here are some of the highlights.

The fastest: Monza, Italy

The nearest thing F1 has to an IndyCar or NASCAR-style oval. Built just outside Milan in 1922, Monza is essentially four quick corners connected by long straights, interrupted by three chicanes to slow the cars down.

The latter means the classic slipstreaming races Monza used to see are a thing of the past. But it remains F1’s quickest track. The fastest ever F1 race took place here in 2003, won by Michael Schumacher at an average speed of 153.843mph.

Video: Lap of Monaco with Michael Schumacher in 2003

The longest: Spa-Francorchamps, Belgium

Like Monza, the Spa circuit in the Ardennes forest in Belgium featured in the first ever world championship in 1950. Then an 8.7-mile monster, even in its reduced form the 4.3-mile track remains the longest in F1.

It’s also one of the most popular among the drivers as it is fast and flowing, with few of the many slow corners found on modern tracks. Eau Rouge, Pouhon, Stavelot and Blanchimont are some of the evocative names of the thrillingly fast corners to be found on the track.

The most glamorous: Monte-Carlo, Monaco

Holding a race around the streets of the tiny principality of Monaco is preposterous and marvelous. Were it not for its prestige and heritage there is no way a similar race could be envisaged today.

Monaco generally does not produce great races because overtaking is practically impossible. But its narrow confines are a stern challenge for the drivers and when combined with a sprinkling of rain it’s one of the toughest events in motor racing.

Video: Lap of Monaco with Ralf Schumacher, 2004

The original: Silverstone, Britain

The world championship began at Silverstone in 1950 and although the circuit has been transformed almost beyond recognition since then, it still features some of F1’s quickest and most challenging corners.

Video: Lap of Silverstone with Jenson Button, 2011

The drivers’ favorite: Suzuka Japan

Along with Spa, the sinuous Suzuka circuit with its unique crossover is regularly named by drivers as one of their favorites.

Not just because of the demanding opening sector, the high-speed corners and the enthusiasm of Japan’s fans. But because it is one of a dwindling number of circuits where a mistake is punished by contact with a barrier instead of a long drive through a wasteland of tarmac run-off.

The newest: Circuit of the Americas, USA

The home of the United States Grand Prix was an instant hit when it held its first race last year. The complex opening sector is among its best features – and of course the warm welcome from American fans who’d gone five years without a race of their own.

The rest

The city of Melbourne welcomes the teams to round one. The opening flyaway tour includes Malaysia, China and Bahrain before heading to Europe for the Spanish Grand Prix.

Canada’s Circuit Gilles Villeneuve often provides exciting races. The German Grand Prix returns to the (short) Nurburgring this year.

A hectic sequence of final races begins with the Singapore night race and takes in Korea, India and Abu Dhabi. The United States Grand Prix on November 17th begin a double-header finale which concludes with the Brazilian Grand Prix in the feverish atmosphere of Interlagos in Sao Paulo.

F1 Primer

  1. apexassassin - Mar 13, 2013 at 1:06 PM

    Who doesn’t love Spa?

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