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Allmendinger: Both IndyCar and NASCAR can be popular

May 24, 2013, 11:15 AM EDT

AJ Allmendinger AP

During yesterday’s Media Day activities at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Team Penske rookie A.J. Allmendinger (starting fifth) was asked about which race was bigger to him: The Daytona 500, which he has run four times in his Sprint Cup career, or the Indianapolis 500, which he will run for the first time this Sunday.

The former Champ Car standout said that Daytona was “special” and expressed his wish to win NASCAR’s biggest event one day. But to him, the Indy experience is second to none.

“We haven’t even gotten to Sunday yet and walking in this place, walking through Gasoline Alley and taking it all in – there’s nothing that comes close to it,” said Allmendinger. “Every year, I’ve watched for whoever would win the race and over the past few days, I’ve been watching all the old races that have been shown [on TV].

“I’ve seen a couple of the races where [team owner] Roger [Penske] won, whether it was with Helio [Castroneves] or Gil [de Ferran] or Sam [Hornish Jr.] going to Victory Lane – or heck, even Rick [Mears] back in ’79 and ’91 – you see those emotions and I don’t think there’s anything that replaces that.”

That answer eventually led to a question about whether NASCAR fans would take offense to that, but Allmendinger responded that his belief didn’t “degrade” Daytona and that everyone is putting too much into the argument of which form of motorsports is better.

“The way I look at it, people are so easy to go, ‘Okay, what’s better? NASCAR or IndyCar? What needs to be bigger?,'” he said. “The problem is, I think there’s enough [room] in North America to say ‘Hey, both series can be big.’ It doesn’t have to be one or the other being better. They’re different, but they can all be just as big.

“…I don’t know if it’s the IndyCar fans or the NASCAR fans or a combo [of them] or the media, but it doesn’t have to be about what’s bigger or better. It just has to be about what it means to you.”

Truth be told, that’s a refreshing opinion from the California native. Fans certainly have the right to their preferences and to argue over them. But from an objective standpoint, it seems more and more these days that it’s essential to have clear, designated “winners” and “losers” in regards to public perception.

For the last two decades, it can be argued that NASCAR has been the “winner” and IndyCar has been the “loser.” But as the latter continues to regain strength bit-by-bit, that could change down the road. One can’t expect the argument between fans of the two categories to ever cease, but every now and then, we need to remember to step back and appreciate what’s good about them both – and all other forms of motorsport for that matter.

As Allmendinger said, it’s all about what it means to you. And in his case, Indy just happens to mean a lot.

“I’ve wanted to be at Indy my whole life,” he said. “And I finally get that opportunity.”

  1. drylake - May 25, 2013 at 6:42 PM

    It’s like the difference between UFC or mixed martial arts and boxing. NASCAR fans would favor UFC while INDYCAR fans would prefer boxing. If you’re addicted to the close finishes and constant wrecks, you’re a NASCAR fan. If you look at the big picture of strategy, live for the one key moment, maybe earlier in the race, that made a difference in the ultimate outcome, it’s INDYCAR. Like UFC fans, NASCAR fans need instant gratification and artificially close finishes. They get bored with yellow free races.

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