Skip to content

FIA will stop race if all cars retire; 107% rule to be relaxed

Mar 13, 2014, 7:30 PM EST

F1 Testing in Jerez - Day Two Getty Images

FIA race director Charlie Whiting has said that in the unlikely event of all cars retiring from the Australian Grand Prix this Sunday, the race would be ended before the two hour time limit has expired.

Following a tumultuous testing period that saw every team encounter reliability problems, a number of F1 pundits and figures have questioned what would happen if all 22 cars failed to finish the race on Sunday. Whiting was quick to dismiss this as being a slight overreaction, but he did say that the FIA would simply draw a curtain over proceedings.

“I think a lot of these doomsday scenarios are quite unlikely, knowing Formula 1 teams and how efficient they actually are,” Whiting explained to journalists in Melbourne. “But if it came to the situation where no cars were actually running, we’d simply stop the race, because there wouldn’t be much of one, would there?

“If the race couldn’t be restarted as the rules say, then the results would be declared on the lap prior to the one during which the race was stopped and whoever was running at that time would be the winner.”

Initially, it was thought that the FIA would have to adhere to the regulations that say the race ends when a) the full complement of laps is completed or b) the two hour time limit expires, meaning that there could have been the odd situation of an empty track until the timer hit zero. Thankfully though, common sense has prevailed, although it would be disastrous for the sport if all of the cars did indeed retire.

Whiting also said that the 107% rule for qualifying would be relaxed. Normally, drivers that post a time which is more than 107% outside of the fastest time in Q1 are not permitted to start the race on Sunday, with now-defunct HRT missing the Australian GP in 2011 and 2012 as a result of this rule. However, there will be some leniency this weekend.

“I think the 107% rule was introduced to make sure that teams that weren’t capable of producing a good car that was of the required performance wouldn’t actually get into the races,” Whiting explained on Thursday. “What we have out here at the moment are eleven teams that we know are capable.

“They may be suffering a temporary performance loss but I’m sure the stewards will look very sympathetically on any team that doesn’t make the 107 per cent. There is a mechanism in the rules to allow that to be done in exceptional circumstances.”

The 2014 Formula 1 season gets underway this evening on NBCSN with F1 Countdown and the first free practice session ahead of this Sunday’s Australian Grand Prix. You can find full TV times here.

  1. chad4208 - Mar 15, 2014 at 2:51 PM

    is this article a joke? talk about a lack of passing; There really will be a lack of passing if all cars retire

  2. worknman24hours - Mar 15, 2014 at 9:14 PM

    I would think the last man standing rule applies.

    If all the cars stopped on track, the last one that stops wins the race since no car can be helped by an external source.

    But then again, there is another rule that states the winning car cannot stop on track too.

    And the FIA is just anal enough to enforce that one too.

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Top 10 NASCAR Driver Searches
  1. D. Suarez (1879)
  2. K. Busch (1853)
  3. M. Tifft (1833)
  4. J. Boston (1738)
  5. A. Self (1651)
  1. C. Coughlin (1289)
  2. S. Heckert (1252)
  3. K. Larson (1225)
  4. D. Kwasniewski (1163)
  5. J. Haley (1094)