Skip to content

IMSA admits incorrect calls during 12 Hours of Sebring

Mar 15, 2014, 11:32 PM EST

Tudor_USCR

IMSA has admitted this evening that it made two incorrect calls during today’s Mobil 1 12 Hours of Sebring.

The No. 22 Alex Job Racing Porsche was called for a stop-and-hold plus 80-second penalty after it was deemed to have made contact with the No. 49 Spirit of Race Ferrari during Hour 7.

However, while the No. 49 Ferrari was indeed tagged by a Porsche – not once, but twice – it was not by the No. 22 AJR Porsche. Each of Porsche North America’s two entries, the No. 911 and No. 912, managed to make contact with the No. 49 in the race.

The AJR and Porsche NA machines carry similar grey and white paint jobs, but run in different classes: The AJR Porsche in GT Daytona, the Porsche NA cars in GT Le Mans. Additionally, they run different tires (AJR has Continentals; Porsche NA has Michelins).

Nonetheless, IMSA erred in calling the No. 22 for the penalty (which is non-appealable) and for not calling the No. 911 with one of its own. The No. 912 wound up winning the race in GTLM.

IMSA’s Scot Elkins said that since the incident occurred earlier in the race, nothing could be done in regards to assessing post-race time penalties to try and make up for the incorrect calls – a prospect he called “making another bad decision on top of an already bad decision.”

“I think everybody knows the way we view our analysis is via video,” Elkins said according to Sportscar365. “We had some very conclusive video … but we involved the wrong cars. It just so happened both of those cars were white Porsches. Both had in-car cameras.

“There’s nothing that we can do in terms of taking time away and doing anything to the results. We’re sorry, and we made a mistake. We have some things in place to fix it for the next time.”

  1. testover6370 - Mar 16, 2014 at 1:28 AM

    Unbelievable that their attitude was “A white Porsche did it, so just pick one at random and ignore all the appeals.” There was a sticker on the car in view of the camera that should have obviously identified it and the NASCAR race control couldn’t comprehend that.

    Now when will the admit their use of safety car periods is incorrect and downright unethical?

Leave Comment

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

Video from NASCAR America

Most unexpected event of 2014?
Top 10 NASCAR Driver Searches
  1. J. Gordon (1848)
  2. K. Kahne (1826)
  3. J. Johnson (1739)
  4. T. Stewart (1645)
  5. J. Logano (1635)