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Room to improve for Ferrari after subpar outing in Australia

Mar 17, 2014, 2:15 PM EDT

Australian F1 Grand Prix - Race Getty Images

While encouraged with the reliability of the F14 T after its first race last weekend at the Australian Grand Prix, Ferrari knows that it faces a sizable gap in regards to overall speed to the Mercedes camp.

Last weekend’s season opener was a entertaining one, but Mercedes’ Nico Rosberg still managed to crush the field and won by a margin of 26.7 seconds.

Meanwhile, Ferrari’s tandem of former World Champions, Fernando Alonso and Kimi Raikkonen, were left to settle for fifth and eighth, respectively.

There’s definitely work to do for the Scuderia as we head for the Malaysian Grand Prix, and two of its key figures – team principal Stefano Domenicali and technical director James Allison – have acknowledged that.

Domenicali pointed out that, among other areas, the performance of the team’s new V-6 power unit needed some work.

“I think that area is an area we need to improve,” he said according to British F1 broadcaster Sky Sports. “I know it seems not logical but the more power that you have, the less you stay on full throttle so you also benefit on the fuel.

“I don’t want to focus only on that because the car has to be improved. It’s a matter of everyone doing his job and being focused on what they have to do at home without saying it’s your fault or my fault.”

Meanwhile, Allison has been weighing the good and the bad about the car overall after the first weekend of the year.

“There is plenty about the F14T that is working very well: The starts and the pace in the corners – especially the high speed ones – are particular strong points, but we need to work further on the stability under braking and the speed on the straights,” he said to Ferrari’s official website.

He made sure to also note that with all of the changes for 2014, the Scuderia is expecting an “even more intense than normal” battle against the other teams in the paddock to develop their new cars.

“Our competitiveness was not acceptable in Melbourne,” he said. “But we intend to fight our way back up the grid with the improvements that we will bring to the car.”