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Dale Jr.: Horsepower drop “coming whether you like it or not”

Apr 4, 2014, 7:45 PM EDT

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NASCAR CEO Brian France has revealed that engine modifications – including a reduction in horsepower – could be coming to the Sprint Cup Series sometime within the next two seasons.

Naturally, that’s led to questions about what impacts those modifications would have on NASCAR’s racing product, which in recent years has been superb in some places (road courses, short ovals) and sometimes suspect in others (intermediate-sized ovals).

Sprint Cup points leader Dale Earnhardt Jr. believes that such changes won’t make the racing less competitive as he feels that “the racing is competitive, any way you slice it.”

However, he’s hopeful that a particular path will be taken by the sanctioning body.

“When you can go to a smaller engine, you preserve some throttle response,” Earnhardt said today at Texas Motor Speedway. “You preserve some reaction in the gas pedal and give the driver a few more tools to be able to use out on the race track when he is driving his race car.

“When you take and put a [restrictor] plate on those cars, you take tons of throttle response out of the car and setting up a pass, particularly on a track that is worn out like this, is a little more challenging with a plate rather than an open engine that is smaller.”

As far as the possible HP drop goes, Earnhardt likened the situation to the recent Sprint Cup return of the No. 3, which his late father, Dale Earnhardt Sr., drove to six of his seven overall Sprint Cup titles.

Richard Childress’ revival of the famous number for rookie driver Austin Dillon was met with loud resistance in some quarters of the NASCAR fan base – but as the season has wore on, the controversy has ebbed for the most part.

Earnhardt believes such would be the case as well with the HP drop if it comes to pass.

“I think the reduction in power is coming whether you like it or not,” he said. “I chose as an individual to get on the side of being productive in that discussion instead of saying ‘We don’t need to do it’ and trying to fight it – let’s try to make sure when it does happen, we do it the right way and give ourselves something to grow into and something to engineers and something that is productive for many years to come.

“…You can have both sides arguing against and for, for however long you want, but it’s going to happen so we might as well start thinking about how we want it to happen and trying to have those discussions on making sure we make the best choice we can make for the sport.”

  1. camino409robert1026 - May 29, 2014 at 4:18 PM

    They got caught with smaller engines before & NASCAR mandated that you had to run a minimim of 350 C.I. & not over 358. The engine builders had found that with the ristrictor plates that the smaller CUBIC INCH ENGINES like 330 would make more power without burning up from the lack of air intake due to the smaller ristrictor plates.A bunch also got caught with small holes in their intakes which allowed more air. Whatever they do,make it something that will last for quite a while & the expense will eventually level off.

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