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Wendell Scott, Bill Elliott, Joe Weatherly, Rex White, Fred Lorenzen named to NASCAR Hall of Fame Class of 2015

May 21, 2014, 4:18 PM EST

Wendell Scott

The five drivers for the sixth induction class of the NASCAR Hall of Fame Class were announced Wednesday afternoon. The inductees for the Class of 2015 are:

* Wendell Scott: One of NASCAR’s true trailblazers, Wendell Scott was the first African-American to race fulltime in NASCAR’s premier series, as well as the first to win a NASCAR premier series race. Scott posted a remarkable 147 top 10s and 495 starts during his 13-year premier series career. He won more than 100 races at local tracks before making his premier series debut, including 22 races at Southside Speedway in Richmond, Virginia, in 1959 en route to capturing both the Sportsman Division and NASCAR Virginia Sportsman championships. Part of Scott’s NASCAR legacy extends to present day with NASCAR’s Drive for Diversity program, the leading youth development initiative for multicultural and female drivers across the motorsport industry since 2004.

* Bill Elliott: In a 37-year driving career, Bill Elliott — with the colorful nickname of “Awesome Bill from Dawsonville (Ga.) — compiled a list of accolades that put him near the top of a number of NASCAR’s all-time lists. His 44 wins rank 16th all-time and his 55 poles rank eighth. But his most prestigious accomplishment came in 1988 when he won the NASCAR premier series championship with six wins, 15 top fives and 22 top 10s in 29 races. In addition, he won a record 16 Most Popular Driver Awards, in part because of his excellence on the big stage; he won the Daytona 500 twice and the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway three times. Elliott posted seven victories at Michigan International Speedway, the third most in track history, including four in a row in 1985 and 1986. He also won the pole six times, trailing only David Pearson (10) for the most in track history. In his illustrious career, Elliott started a track-record 61 races at MIS.

“I don’t know what to say,” Elliott said on Fox Sports 1’s live telecast of the announcement. “I was totally blown away. I wish my mother and dad were here, and my brothers. So many people were instrumental to get me to this point. … The biggest point of our career is we did it kind of our way from Dawsonville, Ga., a group of small-town kids out of nowhere who built a race team.

“…There’s so many people that are deserving to be here today. I’m just blessed and just thankful that I am. I’ve seen a lot of guys that have come into this deal, there’s a lot of good names in this Hall of Fame, and I’m just proud to be one of them.”

* Fred Lorenzen: Fred Lorenzen was one of NASCAR’s first true superstars even though he was a “part-time” driver, never running more than 29 of the season’s 50-plus races. Lorenzen got his start in NASCAR as a mechanic with the famed Holman-Moody team in 1960, but was elevated to lead driver by the end of the year. Lorenzen won three races in only 15 starts the following season. Lorenzen’s best overall season came in 1963 as he finished with six wins, 21 top fives and 23 top 10s in 29 starts. Despite missing 26 races that season, he finished third in the standings. In 1965, he won two of NASCAR’s major events – the Daytona 500 and the World 600.

* Joe Weatherly: Joe Weatherly won two championships (1962-63) and 25 races in NASCAR’s premier series. But that’s only part of his story, which is long on versatility. A decade earlier in 1952-53, he won 101 races in the NASCAR Modified division, capturing that championship in 1953. He even tried his hand in NASCAR’s short-lived Convertible Division from 1956-59 winning 12 times. When he won his first NASCAR premier series championship, in 1962, he drove for legendary owner Bud Moore. When he repeated as champion a year later, he drove for nine different teams.

* Rex White: Consistency was the hallmark of Rex White’s NASCAR career. He finished among the top five in nearly a half of his 233 races and outside the top 10 only 30 percent of the time. White was a short-track specialist in an era in which those tracks dominated the schedule. Of his 28 career wins in NASCAR’s premier series, only two came on tracks longer than a mile in length. Driving his own equipment, White won six times during his 1960 championship season, posting 35 top 10s in 40 starts. He finished in the top 10 six of his nine years in the series including a runner-up finish in 1961. White is now 84 years old.

Also, Anne Bledsoe France, who helped build the sport with husband Bill France Sr., was named the inaugural winner of the Hall of Fame’s Landmark Award. Affectionately known as “Annie B.,” she was the first woman to be nominated for induction into the NASCAR Hall of Fame.

* Anne Bledsoe France: Anne Bledsoe France, paired with her husband, NASCAR founder Bill France Sr., would create what today is one of the largest and most popular sports in the world. Anne played a huge role in the family business. “Big Bill” organized and promoted races; she took care of the financial end of the business. She first served as secretary and treasurer of NASCAR, and when Daytona International Speedway opened in 1959, served in the same roles for the International Speedway Corporation. She also managed the speedway’s ticket office. France remained active in family and business life until her passing in 1992.

The new Class will be formally inducted on Jan. 30, 2015.

The five inductees were chosen from a field of 20 nominees, a change this year from the previous eligibility of 25 candidates to choose from for the Hall’s first five classes. Debate for the class took more than five hours, according to NASCAR officials.

NASCAR Vice President of Corporate Communications Brett Jewkes said all selections came on the first ballot. There were no ties or need for tie-breaking secondary votes.

Voting for the Class of 2015 was as follows: Bill Elliott (87 percent), Wendell Scott (58 percent), Joe Weatherly (53 percent), Rex White (43 percent) and Fred Lorenzen (30 percent).

The next top vote getters were Jerry Cook, Robert Yates and Benny Parsons.

Results for the NASCAR.com Fan Vote, in order of votes received, were Wendell Scott, Bill Elliott, Benny Parsons, Rex White and Terry Labonte.

Failing to be chosen for induction were:

Buddy Baker, won 19 times in NASCAR’s premier (now Sprint Cup) series, including the Daytona 500 and Southern 500

Red Byron, first NASCAR premier series champion, in 1949

Richard Childress, 11-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series

Jerry Cook, six-time NASCAR Modified champion

Ray Fox, legendary engine builder and owner of cars driven by Buck Baker, Junior Johnson and others

Rick Hendrick, 14-time car owner champion in NASCAR’s three national series

Bobby Isaac, 1970 NASCAR premier series champion

Terry Labonte, Two-time NASCAR premier series champion

Raymond Parks, NASCAR’s first champion car owner

Benny Parsons, 1973 NASCAR premier series champion

Larry Phillips, only five-time NASCAR Whelen All-American Series national champion

O. Bruton Smith, builder of Charlotte Motor Speedway and architect of Speedway Motorsports Inc.

Mike Stefanik, winner of record-tying nine NASCAR championships

Curtis Turner, early personality, called the “Babe Ruth of stock car racing”

Robert Yates, won NASCAR premier series championship as both an engine builder and owner

The four nominees who fell short for the inaugural Landmark Award were:

H. Clay Earles, founder of Martinsville Speedway

Raymond Parks, NASCAR’s first champion car owner

Ralph Seagraves, formed groundbreaking Winston-NASCAR partnership as executive with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company

Ken Squier, legendary radio and television broadcaster; inaugural winner / namesake of Squier-Hall Award for NASCAR Media Excellence

Check back for more updates.

Follow me @JerryBonkowski

  1. sidukfan - May 21, 2014 at 4:54 PM

    Scott got in because of his race not for what he did or for what he did for Nascar. There are others that have earned a place in the HOF and were by passed so NASCAR can appear to be pro diversity. Rick Hendrick has done way more for the sport and his employees and himself. HELLO 11 CHAMPIONSHIPS yet Scott is in??? I call B/S on that one

  2. indycarseries500 - May 21, 2014 at 4:56 PM

    How is Benny Parsons still getting snubbed?! He is a premier series champion, 21 Cup wins including a Daytona 500 and a World 600, and his TV work is probably why NASCAR is big enough to have their own Hall of Fame.

  3. manik56 - May 21, 2014 at 4:56 PM

    I admire what Wendell Scott went theough, but HoF? Jackie Robinson was a HoF based on his stats alone. In addition he broke the color barrier and changed the game because of the others that followed. Scott had one win and the sport has lacks minorities to this day. I just don’t see it. It smells of being an election based only on being PC.

  4. techmeister1 - May 21, 2014 at 9:42 PM

    HOF is about personal character as much as racing results. Scott achieved a lot more than most with a lot less resources. He taught his children that they could be achievers and not freeloaders. He showed all repressed people what was possible with exceptional effort and determination. When Petty and others give Wendell Scott major props, it’s not just lip service. They were there and they know the whole story both on and off the track. Most people have no idea what it was like for Scott trying to race in CRASHCAR.

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