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Former Williams director Patrick Head critical of new F1 engines

Jun 1, 2014, 7:30 AM EST

Williams-Bahrain Getty Images

Former Williams director Patrick Head has criticized Formula 1’s decision to introduce new ‘hybrid’ engines for the 2014 season, saying that they are 10 times more expensive than the old ones.

For this season, the regulations were changed to downsize from V8 engines to V6 power units, comprising of a hybrid system that makes the cars in F1 more relatable to road car technology. They are also more efficient than the old systems.

However, introducing the power units has been incredibly expensive, which, at a time when F1 is looking to cut costs, has put pressure on the teams.

“I think the engines are fascinating pieces of kit, but I think they are far too expensive for what they are supposed to be doing,” Head explained to the BBC in Monaco.

“You could produce 800 BHP for €2m ($2.7m) a team each year. I think the teams are having to pay about 10 times that amount. It’s a very expensive way of powering Formula One cars.”

Head has overseen much of Williams’ success in Formula 1, working as the team’s technical director between 1977 and 2004 before becoming the engineering director. In this time, he won nine constructors’ championships and seven drivers’ titles, designing cars for the likes of Ayrton Senna, Alain Prost, Damon Hill and Nigel Mansell.

After a difficult few years, Head is pleased to see that his old team is back on its feet in 2014.

“It’s very good to see,” he said. “I think Pat Symonds and the other people who have come in, and the two drivers are doing a great job.

“I’m very pleased to see Williams, or at least a few of the people in Williams, albeit they know they need to do better, with a bit of a smile on their face, whereas going into a Williams garage last year was no pleasure for anybody.”

  1. techmeister1 - Jun 3, 2014 at 2:15 PM

    I think most people would like to see Williams do well again in F1 but it’s going to be a tough battle unless they have all the resources and people that can make it happen.

    As far as engine costs goes it is definitely disproportionate to the benefits for all involved. It is however a selling point to keep auto makers involved as spending a minimum of $400 M per year requires some tangible technology benefits that can cross over to production.

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